Banned Poetry

This week marks Banned Books Week, the American Library Association’s annual event designed to draw attention to the censorship challenges that some books and authors continue to face even in the twenty-first century. From time-honored classics (Lolita, The Bluest Eye, The Catcher in the Rye, Lady Chatterley’s Lover) to modern young-adult bestsellers (Speak, Two Boys Kissing, Looking for Alaska), novels have born the overwhelming brunt of censorship efforts in this country.

But censors and strict parents aren’t immune to the powerful effects of poetry on impressionable souls. Today on the blog, the Bas Bleu editors are taking a quick look at just a handful of poems that have drawn the ire of school districts, governments, and parents over the years.

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A Guide to Solving Web Development Problems (Test)

This is mainly about how to solve technical problems that arise from using front or back end technologies to make web pages or web apps but some of these steps will be applicable to solving technical problems in general.

Half the technical problems in web development are caused by something trivial like forgetting a semi-colon somewhere and are usually easily solvable if you’ve had your coffee but for all the problems past this level, you’ll probably need to do some structured thinking.

The Web Development Troubleshooting Steps Summary

1. Define the problem that you’re trying to solve. If you’re not asking exactly the right question then you’re not going to get exactly the right answer.

2. Verify the problem exists. Make sure it’s really a problem by replicating the error on more than one machine.

3. Gather additional information about the problem. Use a javascript debugger, fiddler or any other common tool to get additional clues about the nature of the problem.

4. Back-up your work before making even a single teeny tiny little change. Don’t make things worse when trying to fix the problem. Keep a back-up so you can roll back if you have to.

5. Review your past experiences versus the present situation. Have you encountered a similar problem in the past, if so then test to see if your past approach will fix the problem at hand.

6. Search for people who’ve been in similar situations and how they solved the problem. You have all the information you need so start using a search engine to find possible solutions.

7. Make one change at a time (and then test it). Proceed methodically. If you make multiple changes at the same time then you often can’t tell what worked or didn’t work.

8. Break the silo if necessary. If you haven’t solved the issue by this point then it’s time to turn to your technical savvy friends or relevant message boards.

Here’s a list of steps that outline a basic thought process you can go through to solve problems especially if you’re relatively new to web development. The Troubleshooting Steps 1. Define the problem you’re trying to solve.

If you’re trying to answer a question then you must make sure you’re asking the right question – not just asking a question that’s sort of in the right ballpark but the exact question that needs to be asked.

Example: A form that submitted customer leads wasn’t working. My first question was "How come the forms aren’t working" – which was not defined enough to start solving the problem. So I sent a test copy of the form live and that copy worked so the question became "how come the lead generating forms aren’t working on the preview server". Just the slight change in the question completely changed how I tackled the problem.

I know most of the time people assume you can skip this step but seriously take a few minutes to see if you can better define the question and ultimately the problem itself. 2. Verify the problem exists

Things like rendering problems are very common in the web dev business and they can sometimes be caused by something temporal like a network issue or similar.

So one of the first things to do is to ask the person bringing up the problem is whether or not this has occurred on more than one computer.

If not then you’ll need to verify it on another computer. If it proves impossible to replicate then you often don’t have a real error and the problem will take care of itself.

Books Recommending Books

From time to time, fellow bluestockings ask us, “I really liked this book. Do you carry something similar?” So today, as we put the finishing touches on Bas Bleu’s 2018 Book a Month packages (they are so good, y’all), we compiled a list of “books recommending books.” The titles in these pairings aren’t exactly alike: Yes, some have similar plots or subject matter, but others are kindred spirits in terms of character, theme, or mood. We hope you’ll find something new you’ll enjoy! (All of the suggested “try this” titles are available for purchase on our website. Just click on the book cover.)

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September Book a Month: Clementine

As part of Bas Bleu’s 2017 Book a Month program, each month we’re offering discussion questions, author interviews, or other bonus material about our Bluestocking BAM selection to enrich your reading experience—for book clubs as well as thoughtful individuals. (We’ll do our best to avoid plot spoilers, but you should proceed with caution!)

You may think you know everything worth knowing about Winston Churchill. But we suspect you don’t know just how responsible his wife, Clementine Churchill, was for his success—or how fascinating she was in her own right! Our September 2017 Book a Month selection, Clementine by Sonia Purnell, is an absorbing biography of the ambitious, opinionated, always stylish Mrs. Churchill, a clear-eyed portrait of a complex woman too long ignored by history.  Continue reading